January 5 2016

Rules Of Grammar: Chile, Chile, Chilly, and Chili

Rules Of Grammar LogoChile is a South American country that is located along the Pacific coastline. Chile (spelled with a lowercase “c”) is an alternative spelling of the word “chili.” The Free Dictionary defines “chili” as follows: “The pungent fresh or dried fruit of any of several cultivated varieties of capsicum, used especially as a flavoring in cooking.” And of course, “chilly” means frigid.

Here are some machine briefs to differentiate between the four sound-alike words:

chilly= KHIL/YI
chili= KHIL/LI
Chile= KH*IL/LAO*E
chile= KHIL/LAO*E

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September 1 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Immigration vs. Emigration

Immigration is defined as coming to another country to live. Emigration is to leave one country to live in another country. The difference between the two terms is subtle. With immigration the focus is on the country being moved to. With emigration the focus is on the country being moved from.

Examples: I emigrated from America. I immigrated to Melbourne.

To remember the difference between immigration and emigration, remember the following analogy: Emigration is to export as immigration is to import.

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July 2 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Allude vs. Elude

Allude means “To refer without express mention; make indirect or casual reference.”

Elude is defined: “(1) To avoid or escape from by dexterity or artifice. (2) To escape the notice of understanding of. For example, Your meaning eludes me.”

Machine Briefs:

OPTION #1: allude= A/LAOUD
OPTION #2: allude= A/LAO*UD

OPTION #1: elude= AOE/LAOUD
OPTION #2: elude= AOE/LAO*UD

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June 24 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Canvas vs Canvass

Canvas is defined as follows: “(1) A heavy, strong cloth of various grades, used for sails, tents, etc. (2) A piece of such cloth; a sail. (3) A strong, closely woven cloth stretched on a frame and prepared for the reception of colors, as in paintings. (4) A painting. (5) A square-meshed fabric of linen, silk, or the like, on which embroidery or tapestry is worked with a needle. (6) A tent; especially, circus tent.”

When someone is talking about surveying an area, canvass is used. Canvass is defined as follows: “(1) The going about to solicit orders, interest, or votes. (2) A political campaign. (3) A survey taken to ascertain sentiment. (4) A detailed examination; especially, a sifting of votes in an election; a recount.”

Machine Briefs:
OPTION #1: canvas= KAN/VAS
OPTION #2: canvas= KAN/VA*S
OPTION #3: canvas= KWAS

OPTION #1: canvass= KA*N/VA*S
OPTION #2: canvass= KWA*S

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June 11 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Therefore vs. Therefor

Therefore is defined as, “For that reason; consequently.”

Therefor is defined as, “For or in exchange for that or this.”

Here are a few examples of usage:

“He was injured and therefore unable to play.
I think; therefore I am.
Payment was received two weeks after it was due; therefore, he was charged a late fee.
Therefore the Court found the evidence unconvincing.”

“Ordering goods and enclosing payment therefor.
The applicant must submit the application form and any supporting documentation therefor in two weeks’ time.
I’ll explain what we must do and the causes therefor.”

Machine Briefs:
therefore= THRFR
therefor= THR*FR

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May 28 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Baggie vs. Baggy

Baggie is a trademark for manufactured plastic bags of various sizes. Although trademarks are usually capitalized, according to the Free Dictionary: “This trademark, [is] often styled…in lowercase.”

Baggy is defined as: “(1) Loose, puffed out. (2) Loosely constructed and inflated with inessential elements.”

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April 21 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Preventive vs. Preventative

According to WritingExplained.org, “preventive” and “preventative” are interchangeable. They can both be used as a noun or an adjective. The words both “refer to things that prevent, hinder, or act as obstacles.”

WritingExplained.org further explains that between the two word choices, internationally, “preventive” is the preferred choice; being used approximately eight times more than “preventative.”

The website also states that the existence of the word “preventive” predates “preventative” by a few decades, and is preferred by the New York Times, AP Stylebook, The Chicago Manual of Style, and other grammar sources.

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April 9 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Radical vs. Radicle

Radical has the following definitions: “(1) Relating to or affecting the fundamental nature of something; far-reaching or thorough. (2) Advocating or based on thorough or complete political or social reform; representing or supporting an extreme section of a political party. (3) A person who advocates thorough or complete political or social reform; a member of a political party or part of a party pursuing such aims. (4) A group of atoms behaving as a unit in a number of compounds.

Radicle is defined as following: (1) A rootlike subdivision of a nerve or vein. (2) The part of a plant embryo that develops into the primary root.

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March 10 2015

Rules Of Grammar: Perspective vs. Prospective

Prospective is defined as: Something that is likely to happen in the future; or, likely to become.

Perspective refers to a view. It is defined in the following ways: “(1) The technique or process of representing on a plane or curved surface the spatial relation of objects as they might appear to the eye; specifically representation in a drawing or painting of parallel lines as converging in order to give the illusion of depth and distance. (2) The interrelation in which a subject or its parts are mentally viewed; point of view. (3) The capacity to view things in their true relations or relative importance. (4) A visible scene; especially one giving a distinctive impression of distance. (5) A mental view or prospect. (6) The appearance to the eye of objects in respect to their relative distance and positions.

Machine Briefs:
OPTION #1: prospective= PROFPT
OPTION #2: prospective= PR-FPT

OPTION #1: perspective= P-FRPT
OPTION #2: perspective= PEFRPT
OPTION #3: perspective= PERKT

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